Instead, consider investing in a homemade tomato cage made from chicken wire or concrete reinforcement wire. Frequently, people... Tomato Stakes. What you need to make tomato stakes. Wood or metal stake, or pole of any kind – at least 5-6 feet tall, Ties (rope, string, nursery tape, or torn lengths of fabric such as old sheets), about 18-24” long. Connect the stakes to the tomato cage in a couple places each. This method is the easiest of the three methods to start, but requires the most effort to maintain. Vertical String Method. They have no natural way to hold themselves up. It involves tying the tomato at the base of the plant and then to an overhead crossbar. Keep reading to learn more about three common ways to stake tomato plants. Get more ideas on our Staking Tomatoes Pinterest board. Tomato stakes are normally made of wood, bamboo or plastic, and you can now find spiral “self-supporting” tomato stakes at hardware stores and nurseries. Simple tie some twine around a few stakes to make your own tomato cage. Traditional staking can be time-consuming. Find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: Keep up to date with all that's happening in and around the garden. Don’t use chemically treated wood for stakes, since chemicals will run off into the soil. Insert stake into the ground about 3-6 inches from the base of the tomato seedling, just after planting (to prevent root damage). Sections of concrete reinforcing rods (rebar) make excellent tomato stakes. One cage for all your tomatoes. The “original” way to stake tomatoes involves tying the tomato plant to a stake or stick stuck in the ground. Like with tomato stakes, the plants must be checked daily during active growth to, but the taut string provides just enough tension to support a fruit-laden tomato plant without being so tight that it damages the plant. Bamboo tomato cage DIY at The Painted Hinge. We like to use a strong reusable garden wire, wrapped around a few times at a cross in the remesh wire. A tomato cage is probably the most common way to stake tomatoes off the ground. Get your free copy of "10 Must-Know Tomato Growing Tips." This large tomato cage design is sturdy, easy and cheap! Staking tomato plants is an excellent way to improve the quality of the tomatoes you will harvest and helps to keep the tomato plants healthier. This idea was born in a pinch. Now you can make an educated decision and see if staking is a good choice for your garden or not. The tomato plant is then trained up the string as it grows. How to Build a Strong Tomato Stake: A Step By Step Guide. A tomato cage is probably the most common way to stake tomatoes off the ground. Tomato plants do best with this method if the tomatoes are pruned to grow on a single stem. This method is the easiest of the three methods to start, but requires the most effort to maintain. Upright growth means you can plant tomatoes closer together. Finding the best way to stake tomatoes depends on a few factors in your garden. Tomato stakes are normally made of wood, bamboo or plastic, and you can now find spiral “self-supporting” tomato stakes at hardware stores and nurseries. 10. A stake for an indeterminate tomato should be at least 7 feet tall and 2 inches x 2 inches across; taller is better. Pruning lessens the need for extra ties, but too much pruning may reduce size of crop. Next, we take one of our sturdy cattle panels and use two re-usable zip ties to secure it the stake. This method is the best way to stake tomatoes in all size gardens and does particularly well for container grown tomatoes where space is limited. 2. The Stake A Tomato Cage. To secure the plant to the stake, we prefer to use these soft reusable plant ties. To stake tomatoes well, make sure they’re sturdy enough so they don’t topple down when storms or winds hit. Make a dowel rod teepee. It only takes two re-usable zip ties to attache the grid to the posts. This 20-page guide is filled with  tips you need to know to have a successful tomato crop, whether you’re a beginning or experienced gardener. All rights reserved. This 20-page guide is filled with  tips you need to know to have a successful tomato crop, whether you’re a beginning or experienced gardener. Isn’t that how most ingenious homesteading ideas happen? You want to talk about a simple tomato trellis/cage creation, this is it. FREE! She began looking around for what she had and boom, the stake A tomato cage was born. Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips! The “original” way to stake tomatoes involves tying the tomato plant to … Nearly any wooden or metal post (or pole of any kind) will work as a stake, as long as it’s at least 5-6 feet tall – taller is preferable. Plants must be tied throughout the season. Beautiful bamboo tomato cage. Finally, add a stake along the main tomato plant stalk if it doesn’t have one already. Making one tomato cage for … You could also use regular wire, garden velcro, or zip ties to connect the stakes to the tomato cage. It also allows the plants to grow without having to prune the tomatoes. Staking Tomato Plants – Find The Best Way To Stake Tomatoes The Tomato Cage. Staked tomatoes tend to ripen sooner than un-staked plants. Support all your tomatoes with one cage. Bamboo stalks work well. One end should be pointed because it is easier to drive a pointed stake into the ground. Tomatoes can be easier to train if they are pruned, but this isn’t absolutely necessary as string can be tied to any additional branches that grow. Wooden stakes should be at least 1” square to provide adequate support. Plants grown on tomato stakes must be checked daily during active growth and tied to the stake as they grow. The perfect tomato staking tape ... How to tie up tomato plants ... Pruning tomato plants: how and when to do it ... Return from Tomato Stakes: How to Stake and Tie Tomatoes to Tomato Dirt home. When plant is properly pruned and tied, traditionally-staked tomatoes are accessible and easy to pick. Whether you use a tomato cage, tomato stakes or grow tomatoes on strings, one thing is certain. The author needed a way to tie up her tomato plants. Plants grown on tomato stakes must be checked daily during active growth and tied to the stake as they grow. So, this holiday season, we created a giving campaign for two of our favorite non-profits who are working to help put food on the tables of hungry families across the U.S. and around the world. TomatoDirt.com. Sign up for our newsletter. It also needs to be sturdy because a vine with lots of tomatoes on it can get quite heavy. 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